Healthcare Systems

Increased Demand For Technology In The Healthcare System

Many from North America and Western Europe have chosen to immigrate to Asia. Fifty percent of their costs are not for research and development(much of which is subsidized by the taxpayers), but for their marketing expenses – everything from fancy dinners for doctors who sell lots of their medicines, to the many two and three page ads in magazines urging patients to “Ask your doctor if Dynofab is right for you,” to all-expenses-paid trips to Hawaii to educate doctors on that company’s latest prescription drugs.

Speaking from a strictly medical perspective, recent technologies for monitoring the health of senior citizens include blood pressure monitoring devices, oxygen therapy devices, patient temperature management devices, and cardiac monitoring and cardiac rhythm management (CRM) devices.

An article in The New York Times recently shed light on the shrinking community of home health aides or personal care attendants in the U.S. According to Paul Osterman of the Sloan School of Management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, if the number of workers in this field of home healthcare continues to fall, the country will be faced with a shortage of around 350,000 paid care providers by 2040.

With medical devices becoming increasingly interconnected thanks to rising penetration of the Internet, growing use of smartphones and a slew of other medical devices, and expanding hospital networks, detecting and managing diabetes at home has become not only convenient but rather effective.

First, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), France has the best health care system in the world It has been widely reported that the WHO found the French system to be number 1 while the Canadian system is number 30 and the U.S. number 37.